Number of Texans sickened by E. coli from romaine lettuce rises

Number of Texans sickened by E. coli from romaine lettuce rises

Number of Texans sickened by E. coli from romaine lettuce rises

Of 158 patients interviewed by state and local health officials, all but 18 reported eating romaine lettuce in the week before their illness started. A total of 26 people have developed a type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome. That being said, the CDC continues to investigate the outbreak and warned that new cases from May could still come to light due to a three-week lag in reporting.

Overall, five deaths have been reported in Arkansas, California, Minnesota and NY. On Friday, health officials said they had learned of four more - one in Arkansas, one in NY, and two in Minnesota.

Officials said that first illness began sometime between March 13 and May 12. There have been 197 people sickened in 35 states, the CDC report said. While almost 90 percent of those who fell ill reported eating romaine lettuce in the week before they were sickened, some told the CDC that they did not personally eat the lettuce but were in close contact with somebody who did.

Officials urge anyone who thinks they may be ill with an E. coli infection to see their doctor.

Meanwhile, government authorities are still trying to figure out how and why the outbreak happened.

As of June 1, 89 people have been hospitalized by the outbreak, but a recall has not been announced for romaine lettuce.

"Any contaminated product from the Yuma growing region has already worked its way through the food supply and is no longer available for consumption", said FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb. The growing season in Yuma ended April 16.

Most E. coli bacteria are not harmful, but some produce toxins that can cause severe illness.

Some of the tainted lettuce tied to the massive E. coli outbreak in the United States was from Imperial County.

Related news



[an error occurred while processing the directive]