World Health Organisation classifies 'gaming disorder' as a mental health condition

World Health Organisation classifies 'gaming disorder' as a mental health condition

World Health Organisation classifies 'gaming disorder' as a mental health condition

People who compulsively play video games could soon be diagnosed with a mental health disorder.

The move means that people will now be able to receive treatment for their addictions to video games and that the NHS in the United Kingdom will be able to provide treatment to children addicted to games free of charge. The player will give increasing priority to gaming, so that it takes precedence over other life interests and daily activities.

Video games across all kinds of genres, devices and platforms are enjoyed safely and sensibly by more than 2 billion people worldwide, with the educational, therapeutic, and recreational value of games being well-founded and widely recognised.

According to World Health Organization, there are three major criteria for the diagnosis of gaming disorder: Gaming takes precedence over other activities so much that a person often stops doing other things, a person continues gaming even when it causes issues in their life or they feel that they can't stop, and gaming causes significant distress and impairments in a person's relationships with others, as well as their work or school life.

Dr. Levounis said he suspects the American Psychiatric Assocation will elevate gaming disorder to full-recognition status in the next edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

"The pattern of gaming behaviour may be continuous or episodic and recurrent", reads the WHO's classification of gaming disorder. Cases similar to hers, where people place essential body functions such as eating and using the bathroom lower on their survival list than playing video games, are not rare. The WHO was discussing adding gaming addition back in December 2017, when it introduced it in a draft version of ICD-11.

As video games such as Fortnite have become a ubiquitous social phenomenon for teenagers, there's growing concern in the medical community about video game addiction.

"What we're talking about - and what the World Health Organisation is talking about - is the people who can no longer stop, no longer control their use".

And in South Korea, at least two children have starved to death, likely because their caretaking parents were busy playing video games.

Lubna Alansari, WHO's Assistant Director-General talked about the ICD saying, "It is a cornerstone of health information and ICD-11 will deliver an up-to-date view of the patterns of disease".

World Health Organization said the ICD team received more than 10,000 proposed revisions for the newest edition of the document.

It is scheduled to be presented to WHO member states at their annual World Health Assembly in May 2019 for adoption in January 2022, the WHO said.

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