Antibiotic-resistant salmonella from chickens infects almost 100 people

Antibiotic-resistant salmonella from chickens infects almost 100 people

Antibiotic-resistant salmonella from chickens infects almost 100 people

The Illinois Department of Public Health said five cases of the bacterial infection have been reported in the state, one of 29 in which a multi-drug-resistant strain of salmonella has been found.

Officials say almost 90% of cases that have been reported have involved preparing or eating chicken products that were purchased raw, including ground chicken, chicken pieces and whole chicken. The most cases have been reported in Illinois, Ohio, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, and MA, according to the CDC who is investigating the outbreak. At least 21 people have been hospitalized but there have been no deaths linked to the outbreak.

Lab tests haven't been able to successfully trace the source of the tainted chicken, so the organization can not release any supplier names or product information at the moment.

Many types of raw chicken from a variety of places are making people sick, the agency reported.

Most people infected with salmonella get diarrhea, fever, and stomach cramps within 3 days of exposure. "Ill people range in age from less than 1 year to 105, with a median age of 36", the CDC said.

Cook raw chicken thoroughly to kill harmful germs: Chicken should always be cooked to an internal temperature of 165°F to kill harmful germs.

The CDC has called the rise in infections from antibiotic-resistant bacteria "a global threat", saying at least 23,000 people die yearly and 2 million become infected in the USA alone. Food poisoning can be prevented through good hand washing and cleaning surfaces where raw chicken has been handled or prepared.

More information can be found on the CDC website.

Use separate cutting boards for meat, poultry, seafood and vegetables. The CDC also warns consumers to take extra precautions when preparing raw chicken and has provided several food safety tips to help avoid contracting salmonella.

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