Trump to press border wall fight in State of the Union speech

Trump to press border wall fight in State of the Union speech

Trump to press border wall fight in State of the Union speech

While it's likely he will reiterate his demands for billions of dollars in funding for a wall along the southern US border, Trump could also use the address to make a pitch for more bipartisan issues, including health care, infrastructure and economic growth.

But will anyone buy it?

President Donald Trump and Melania Trump have invited 11-year-old Joshua Trump to the State of the Union on February 5, as the first lady's plus one, after the 6th grader was bullied in school for his last name.

But there will be plenty more to keep an eye - and ear - on as Trump addresses a joint session of Congress. His remarks will be followed by two responses: former Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams will deliver the Democratic response, and California Attorney General Xavier Becerra will give the Spanish-language remarks.

"It's a little bit of a late-in-life conversion, where now that the Democrats are in charge of the lower chamber it's time to strike a chord of unity", said Mark Hamrick, senior economic analyst at consumer financial services company Bankrate.com.

"Democrats can call it a fence, the president can call it a wall and then we can call it a day, which I think is one way of skinning the cat", said Cornyn, who is a close adviser to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

That obsession has already cost the president politically, pushing down his approval numbers while leaving his primary political antagonist, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, more popular. That's not to make light of the bullying Joshua has experienced, but it does emphasize where the Trumps' real concerns lie: squarely with themselves. Despite the shutdown, the U.S. economy added a robust 304,000 jobs in January, marking 100 straight months of job growth.

Trump's address will have a theme of "Choosing Greatness" and will also feature a prolonged review of the administration's foreign policy achievements and vision, spanning North Korea, Venezuela, the Islamic Republican of Iran, the fight against the Islamic State, the US presence in Syria and the future of the USA role in Afghanistan.

The speech comes on the heels of a record-long partial government shutdown, which ended on January 25 after spanning 35 days.

It's hard to imagine anyone actually getting excited about the State of the Union, beyond people who have a thing for hearing elderly men describe fantasies about women being kidnapped with duct tape over their mouths.

To that end, Trump is going to talk about divisiveness in US politics as an ill.

U.S. officials say the Islamic State group now controls less than 10 square kilometers (3.9 square miles) of territory in Syria, an area smaller than New York's Central Park.

That's down from an estimated 400 to 600 square kilometres (155 to 230 square miles) that the group held at the end of November before Trump announced the withdrawal, according to two officials who were not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.

Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer on Tuesday criticized Trump over the economy, healthcare and other issues.

For Trump and his inner circle, the wall has become the dominant policy concern, to the exclusion of almost all else: As an administration official told The New York Times last month, it has become a one-issue White House. An announcement is expected on a new initiative aimed at ending transmissions of HIV by 2030. Those numbers are slightly worse for Trump's cause than when Gallup polled the same question last June and found 57 percent opposed and 41 percent in support.

Related news



[an error occurred while processing the directive]