Gov. Gavin Newsom will suspend death penalty in California

Gov. Gavin Newsom will suspend death penalty in California

Gov. Gavin Newsom will suspend death penalty in California

According to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) death row list, 737 inmates are being granting temporary reprieves through this executive order, which is the largest in the nation. "We're poised to potentially oversee the execution of more prisoners than any other state in modern history", Newsom said in an interview with the LA Times before issuing the moratorium.

"Our death penalty system has been - by any measure - a failure", Newsom plans to say in his remarks.

His order also points to the 164 people who have been freed from death row after they were found to be wrongfully convicted. California hasn't executed anyone since 2006, under then-Republican Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, and inmates are far more likely to die of old age. This comes on the heels of Californians actually voting to bolster the speed with which the state can execute an inmate.

There are now 24 inmates on death row who have run out of appeals to their sentence.

"Governor Newsom, who supported the failed initiative to end the death penalty in 2006, is usurping the express will of California voters and substituting his personal preferences via this hasty and ill-considered moratorium on the death penalty", Hanisee said in a statement.

In the U.S., the death penalty is inevitably plagued with arbitrariness, racial disparities, and error; 164 people, including four from California, have been released from death row since 1973 after being later found innocent.

While campaigning for a measure to repeal the death penalty in 2016, he told The Modesto Bee editorial board he would "be accountable to the will of the voters", if he were elected governor.

Just last month, Newsom issued an executive order that allowed for new DNA testing of evidence in the high-profile case of death row inmate Kevin Cooper, who was sentenced in 1985 for the murders of four people and has exhausted his appeals.

The executive order will also argue that capital punishment is inherently unfair - applied more often to people of color and those with mental disability, according to an administration source.

Kim Kardashian West, who has championed criminal justice reform and successfully lobbied President Donald Trump to commute a Tennessee woman's life sentence, said she was "very supportive" of the governor's decision. "I've carved out my piece of all this". His administration's regulations are stalled by challenges in both state and federal court, though those lawsuits may be halted now that Newsom is officially withdrawing the regulations. In recent years, other states have abolished the death penalty and several other governors have placed moratoriums on executions.

Newsom's aides said it has not yet been decided what will become of the execution chamber, or whether corrections officials have been told to top preparing for executions, for instance by running drills.

This Sept. 21, 2010, file photo shows the interior of the lethal injection facility at San Quentin State Prison in San Quentin, Calif. Gov. Gavin Newsom is expected to sign a moratorium on the death penalty.

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